Kruze consulting has quite the client list when it comes to Enterprise SaaS startups. Unlike a lot of our Consumer SaaS clients, Enterprise focused SaaS companies often have an additional layer of complication - bookings, and how these bookings roll into recognized revenue.

Taking a closer look, let’s talk about what bookings are, and how they compare to the revenue you’d see a public company present.

Companies with sales teams or with a setup/delay to the customer go-live date will have “bookings.” A booking is when a prospect agrees to become a client. For most companies, this is when they sign a contract. You may have a salesperson talking to a prospect for a few weeks to many months, but when they finally sign the contract to become a customer you have what is called a “booking.”

For simplicity sake in this post, you can talk about a booking in terms of annual contract value (ACV) or ARR (Annual Recurring Revenue), or Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR).

ACV is what your new contract will be worth in the 1st year. Note most people exclude any one-time integration or service revenue, although we do have a few clients who like to include that in ACV. We’ve even seen people estimating expected upsells into ACV. Like a lot of SaaS metrics, It’s not a GAAP term, so there is some latitude about how CEOs use it. But it’s important to be consistent; choose a way to calculate it and stick with it.

ARR is the Annual Recurring Revenue from your customers. This the revenue you’d collect in the coming 12 months if you don’t add or churn anything. Some clients want to report out on booked ARR and recognized ARR. We’ll get deeper into that in just a moment.

MRR is the Monthly Recurring Revenue. So it’s the ARR divided by 12. Or you could say ARR is MRR times 12. Again, this can be booked or recognized, depending on how you want to report it.

BUT, now onto the purpose of this piece:

What’s the Difference Between Booked vs. Revenue in Enterprise SaaS?

As we mentioned above, you can call something a booking when the client signs the contract, even if you aren’t going live with the customer for a while. But you can’t recognize the revenue, according to GAAP, until you are delivering the service to the client.

Here is an example: Let’s say your prospect signs a 12 month, $120,000 contract on January 1st for a service that will begin on February 1st. You can say that your ARR has increased $120,000 - but what you are really saying is that your bookings ARR is up. You won’t (or shouldn’t at least) recognize that revenue until February, at which point your MRR will go up $10,000 ($120,000 divided by 12 months).

Here is a more complicated example, with multiple contracts being signed and going live on different dates:

1st contract 2nd contract 3rd contract 4th contract 5th contract
Contract Signed 1/1/2019 2/28/2019 2/28/2019 3/1/2019 3/30/2019
Go Live Date 2/1/2019 3/1/2019 4/1/2019 3/1/2019 4/1/2019
Term 12 months 12 months 12 months 12 months 12 months
ACV $120,000 $120,000 $120,000 $120,000 $120,000

One of these contracts will be called a booking and get recognized as revenue in the same month - contract 4. In this contract, the signed date and go live date are both March. The others will be called bookings in the month they are signed, but won’t add to recognized ARR until the month the service starts being delivered.

Here is a breakdown of the above contracts and their booking vs ARR dates:

January February March April
ACV Bookings $120,000 $240,000 $240,000 $0
ARR Bookings $120,000 $240,000 $240,000 $0
MRR Bookings $10,000 $20,000 $20,000 $0
Recognized ARR $0 $120,000 $360,000 $600,000
Recognized MRR $0 $10,000 $30,000 $50,000

As the CEO of an Enterprise SaaS company, make sure you understand if you are talking bookings or recognized revenue. Your bookkeeper should be able to help you out if you have questions.

If there is one place we see the automated and “cheapo” bookkeepers mess up, it’s this. Revenue recognition is important - you need to show the right growth curve if you are going to raise the next round of financing. These days, VC term sheets come in fast, which means you need to be ready to quickly present correct historical financials - specifically making sure your MRR and ARR numbers are right.

You can’t tell a potential investor that you have $9 million in ARR over coffee in the morning, and then send historical financials in the afternoon that show you only have $330,000 in monthly recognized revenue. That’s a great way to reduce a VC’s excitement about your company!